Best Language Learning Games

32 Best Language Learning Games for All Levels

Language learning games are a fantastic tool when picking up another language. They’re an excellent language learning hack in more ways than one. They build motivation, increase confidence, grow vocabulary, and can practice and improve multiple language skills all at once. The best part? They’re oodles of fun!

1. Go Fish

Level: Beginner

Cost: $1.25 + CAD

Materials: Deck of Cards

Number of Players: 2+

This is one of the first games I introduce my students to, and often in the first couple of lessons for new language users, for several reasons. First, the rules are simple and often already known, which means it’s one less thing for them to think about and they can focus on mastering vocabulary instead. Second, the vocab needed for Go Fish covers a lot of basics – numbers, asking for something, and polite phrases (yes, please, no thank you, congratulations). Of course, a lot of variety can be incorporated into this game. Animals or any other vocabulary can replace the numbers, there are many ways to ask for something (may I, can I, do you, etc…), and different levels of formality can be used. Another reason I love this game is because it forces the student to hone their listening skills right off the bat in an enjoyable and carefree environment. Often times I will start with a set of stock phrases for the student and I to use. Once I can tell they’re comfortable in the question-and-answer volley we’ve established, I will say the same phrase in a different way to see if they’re paying attention and see how they will respond. Last, a large part of why I love Go Fish is because when you tell students in the 2nd or 3rd lesson that they will play a game completely in the new language they look at you like you’re nuts. More often than not, students complete the listening and speaking task (aka playing the game) and they’ve aced it. Not only have they aced it, but they know it and now they’re beaming with confidence because they actually played a whole game in a brand new language. It’s magical!

Go Fish Language Learning Game

2. Licence Plate

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 2+

Licence Plate is a fan favourite among my students, regardless of age. This super fun game was introduced to me in university by someone who played on family road trips. The goal was to complete their phrase by the time the next car whizzed by and they’d have to come up with another phrase just as quickly. Naturally, I wanted to share the good times. It’s a great choice for intermediate or advanced users of a language since both vocabulary and syntax play a role. Player 1 writes 4 letters (“RTVO”) and Player 2 responds, as quickly as possible, with a sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word must correspond with the 4 letters (“Routine TVs vet osteopaths”). There are only 2 other rules – 1) the phrase or sentence has to make sense in the target language (syntax), and 2) creativity is the key. The response can be as zany and fantastical and bizarre as students want. As an extra layer, for students who are learning SVO (subject-verb-object) or word types, I’ll have them identify each one after they’ve completed their phrase.

Best Language Learning Games Licence Plate

If you’ve got a large group of students this language learning game can be adapted – and it’s great online and in-person. One group version is to have Player 1 (teacher or a designated student) write the 4 letters and then everyone writes their own phrase. A second group version is to split students into groups of 4. Each group must complete the phrase together, with one person choosing the first word, then the next student choosing the second word, and so on. A third is to partner everyone up and they play the regular 2-person game. It’s great for team-building, perfect for thinking fast on your feet, and awesome for creativity, vocabulary, spelling, and so on. A fourth way that this could be played in a group is to make it a race, though that’s not my favourite since creativity and confidence may take a hit for several students in the process. I’d love to hear which version you play with your students, either 1-on-1 or in a group!

3. Word Association

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper, whiteboard, or keyboard)

Number of Players: 2+

Word Association, Brain Dump, Word Web – this can have many names, but I like Word Association best. Why? Because it’s the most accurate description of the task. I love this language learning game as an introductory exercise for students and typically use it for the first time within the first few lessons. The more vocabulary one has, the more word associations one can make. I love using this in the beginning and then, months later when a students’ vocabulary has grown, playing it again and having the student compare to their first few games. Talk about a confidence boost! Sometimes I’ll use the same word both times too.

I love Word Association for the many skills it incorporates: vocabulary building, spelling, creativity, fluency (speed), pronunciation, problem solving, metacognition (thinking about their thinking process), word type identification, increasing confidence, and more. The end goal is actually to help students become better writers. Remember in school when a teacher would mark up your paper after you poured all of your effort into it and tell you to re-write a section? It was the worst! I would literally think to myself that there was no other option, this was the best, and how could you ask such an impossible task of me?! This game breaks down that task so it no longer will be a writer’s nightmare. By having students free associate, it loosens up their mind and allows ideas to flow. The more they practice, the faster they’re able to bounce from one idea to the next without blocks. It also helps them make the link between verbs and nouns to maintain an idea, yet say it in a different way. Funnily enough this skill translates perfectly for learning additional languages where syntax will differ, and the value different word types have will restructure how you phrase your thoughts. It’s also great for language learners practising speaking because speed and creativity are such key skills in those scenarios.

But enough about how much I love this activity – you need to know how to play or facilitate it! Word Association is very flexible, so feel free to adapt where you see possible as well. The guiding light in this game is to have the students write down every last word they can think of that they associate with the starting word. From there it’s just format and organization that change how it’s played.

Version 1 – Online / Paper

If you’re back online for school this year (pandemic, be gone!) or if your private or tutoring students are online, this version is for you. I’ll explain the 2-player game, but it can be played with a full class or individually. Player 1 (teacher or student) types one word into the chat. Player 2 types the first word that comes to mind. Speed is key here and I emphasize to the students that it doesn’t matter if it’s a word someone else would say or not. The less thinking, the better – it’s more of a reaction game. Then, Player 1 types the first word that comes to mind from Player 2’s word, and so on. This back-and-forth can go on for as long as you’d like. If you’re playing with a class online, use your attendance list, birth dates, or something similar, to order the students.

The second step to the game is for each player to randomly choose 3 words from the list. The other player then needs to make 1 sentence incorporating those 3 words. Sometimes if the class is really competitive I will have them make sentences for another group’s word or race to see which group can create the fastest sentence. This part of the game requires some syntactic knowledge, hence it being better-suited to an intermediate or higher level crowd. Similar to Licence Plate, these sentences can be as bizarre as the players want, as long as they make grammatical sense.

Best Language Learning Games Word Assocation 2-player
Version 2 – Paper (map)

Sometimes I have students do this as a solo brainstorming activity. If we’ve been learning word types (parts of speech) they will use/create a graphic organizer with 5 sections. The middle is the starting word and then each other section is labelled with “Noun”, “Verb”, “Adjective”, and “Adverb”. There are two ways the activity can be carried out. Either allot a certain amount of time to complete each section or provide 1 chunk of time to fill in the words in the correct spots as they pop into their minds. You know your students best – play to their strengths and challenge their weaknesses for the most effective results.

Best Language Learning Games Word Association 1-player
Version 3 – Paper (free form)

In this version of Word Association, I have the students write the word in the middle of the page and then they organize their thoughts however they want. Some students choose to make lists, others write every which way on the page. This is a great method to use if you’re getting to know your student and want to understand how they prefer to do things. I would maybe contrast a second round with some structure (see Version 2) to see how their performance compares. Some students really thrive with provided structure and for others it hinders their process. Trial and error is your best friend here. Keep in mind as well that there is no right or wrong for this game.

Best Language Learning Games Word Association Free Flow
Version 4 – Paper (list)

This is essentially the same as Version 2, but with one player free associating off of each new word they add to their own list. To add an extra challenge, language learners can aim to write more words than the last time, or to write more words in a shorter period of time.

4. Memory

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: $10 – $40 CAD

Materials: Memory game or homemade version

Number of Players: 2+

This classic children’s game is ideal for vocabulary building and pronunciation practice. This can also double as a Go Fish card deck – win-win! You can purchase one or create you own. If you don’t want to cut paper on top of writing/colouring each card, use cue cards.

Memory is a fantastic tool for internalizing newly introduced vocabulary, and it’s a lot more fun than covering up a word and repeating it 10x. How to play the game stays the same. Each player takes a turn flipping over 2 cards. If the cards are the same, they win the pair. If they’re not the same, they get flipped back over. The language component comes in because every time a card is flipped the language learner says what it is. The learner can’t earn a pair or flip mismatched cards back over unless they say the word. You could put a “penalty” in for missing that step, such as handing over a won pair to the opponent. If vocabulary is mastered but students are looking for an added challenge, mix up the cards every so many turns so that your memory works overtime.

Memory games are great for learning languages

5. BINGO

Level: Beginner or Intermediate

Cost: FREE to $2 – $25 CAD

Materials: BINGO cards, BINGO chips/small items to cover spaces

Number of Players: 3+

If you grew up in Ontario in the ’90s, you might remember Friday Bingos in French class. Great for listening and speaking skills, BINGO is also a lexicon builder. I recently played this with students learning English phonics and used it to practice letter names and sounds. BINGO can be found in stores or online through Teachers Pay Teachers or other teacher resource websites.

BINGO Game

6. Battleship

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Paper, markers or pencil crayons, ruler (if needed)

Number of Players: 2

If you’re looking for an engaging and effective way to practice verb conjugations without the repetition of worksheets (though they definitely have their place and purpose), I would highly suggest a game of Battleship. As you’ll see in the image below, pronouns go down the side and verb infinitives across the top. Each turn players need to say the pronoun and conjugated verb. If they conjugate it correctly on a square with one of your chosen verbs, then it’s “hit”. If they don’t conjugate it properly prompt them to correct it. This game can be used for any verb tense. You could also play this with nouns and adjectives in languages where these word types need to agree in gender and number. Players can spell them out loud or on paper for each turn.

Verb Battleship for language learning

7. Headlines

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: N/A

Number of Players: 3+

Pro Tip: Drama games are amazing for language learning games. Headlines was a drama game I taught in practicum though I realized it could be used in an intermediate or advanced language class as well. Have students stand in a circle, or if distancing is required have them stay in their seats. The first person says (or writes) the first word of the headline, and each subsequent person adds a word to the headline. Teachers can provide a theme to help guide the students. This one can be pretty entertaining for everyone since it’s an open-ended activity. Depending on your students, time, and health restrictions, you can add another creative piece to it by asking students to either act out or illustrate the headline they created.

8. Codebreaks

Level: Intermediate

Cost: FREE! or under $10

Materials: Online “worksheet” or paper codebreakers

Number of Players: 1

These books are super for a multitude of reasons. On the fun and logistical side of things, they’re affordable and can be found in grocery stores or dollar stores. Second, they’re great for ending or starting a class when there’s not enough time to complete a full task. Third, if students finish their work early, Codebreaks are another engaging option to practice language skills while having a blast. And then there are all of the language benefits. First up is spelling, which this game relies on since accuracy is key. The next language skill is related to morphology and patterning. For example, if you figure out that the third last letter in an English-language Codebreaks word is “I”, you can make an educated guess that the remaining two letters are “N” and “G”. It’s really helpful for students to be aware of common patterns and letter pairings (“-th-“, “qu-“, “-ed”, etc…) when learning how to spell in another or their own language. Third on the linguistic skills list is recognition of letter frequency. For example, it’s highly unlikely that you’re going to see a “Z” 10 times in a Codebreaks, however you’re likely to see quite a few “E”s. When introducing this activity elicit from students which letters they think they see the most often in the language. Then test their theories by looking at writing samples and having them count the number of each letter. Especially when it’s our first language, this isn’t something that people pay attention to – but it can be very helpful. Last, have students make a vocabulary list of the unknown words in the puzzle, look them up in a dictionary, and then write a sentence or story using them.

Codebreakers are great language learning activities

9. Word Muddle

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE! or cost of the game (unable to find online at the time of publishing)

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard), or the game

Number of Players: 2+

Chances are that you had a similar activity in your Language Arts classes growing up. Word Muddle is taking a collection of mixed up letters and making as many 3+ letter words from them in a set amount of time. The ultimate goal is to figure out the word that uses all of the letters. You don’t need to purchase the game to play this. Simply choose a word (“markers”) and mix up the letters for your students (“skerrma”). This is an excellent activity in a pinch or even as a weekly challenge for a classroom.

Word Muddle language game

10. Guess Who

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE! or cost of game

Materials: Pictures of people you know (or celebrities or randoms!), or Guess Who game

Number of Players: 2

There are a bunch of variations to this game available online, including one from TES.com with French and Spanish names. My favourite is when teachers switch out the board game pictures with those of their students! Guess Who is great for using a variety of vocabulary, such as colours, body parts, clothing, jewellery, hairstyles, facial expressions / emotions / adjectives, and professions. As a speaking game it helps work on pronunciation and asking and answering questions.

Guess Who speaking and listening game

11. Codenames

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: $25 CAD

Materials: Codenames game

Number of Players: 4

I am obsessed with this game. The first two times I played it with friends turned into epic 5am marathons. Seriously, if you haven’t tried this game yet, language learner or not, try it. Head to a game cafe, check out your local library’s game collection, or ask a friend who has it to bust it out. You won’t regret it! This game is definitely for a more advanced crowd, though I might even suggest including some dictionary use to help language learners. The teacher in me says you can add an extra layer to this game and have players keep a list of new vocabulary which they can look up and use in a sentence or story afterwards as well.

Codenames board game

12. Mystery Item

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Bag or box, any random items in your home or classroom that fit inside the container

Number of Players: 3+

Another great ice breaker and drama game, Mystery Item is an entertaining way to get people speaking. Grab a box or dark bag and place any number of items in it that you choose. Have a student reach into the bag without looking and describe what they feel (shape, texture, size, etc…). Other students can ask questions and make guesses as to what the object is. You can tailor the objects to mirror the vocabulary students have been learning, or just put any random items in if it’s a more advanced class.

13. Telephone

Level: Beginner or Intermediate

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Humans

Number of Players: 4+

A primary school classic, a game of Telephone is sure to make people laugh, screw up their noses, and listen really intently. The first player in a line or circle of players whispers a word or sentence into the second player’s ear. The second player has to pass on exactly what they hear to the third person, and so on. The last person says out loud to the group the message that they received. Compare and giggle with how it matches (or misses!) the original telephone message.

Telephone game

14. Hedbanz

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: $22 CAD

Materials: Hedbanz board game

Number of Players: 2+

Hedbanz is another great option for practising speaking, listening, pronunciation, vocabulary, question asking and answering, and fluency. You can play the game in the standard way (think Ellen’s “Heads Up”) or pick out subsets within the cards and work with that specific vocabulary.

Hedbanz language game

15. Mission Time

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: nothing, or something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 2+

This can be played with speaking and listening as the focus or reading and writing. The teacher will assign tasks (1 or a list) to an individual or group of students. The tasks can be actions like “shake hands with your neighbour” or written like “write the spelling word that begins with B”. They can be as simple or complex as is required. For example, a simple task could be “draw a person” and a complex version would be “draw a person who’s wearing blue pants and a yellow shirt and waving their right hand at the purple dog beside them”. One way to score this would be speed – whoever completes their tasks first wins or gets a point. The second way to allot points would be for accuracy. If the learner writes a word that starts with P instead of B, then they wouldn’t get the point. This is an effective way to assess listening and reading comprehension and can help alleviate students’ stress in a testing scenario or make for a fun activity.

16. Make-a-Word

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 2+

Traditionally known as Hangman, I’ve “rebranded” this game to be more appropriate. Depending on where you are, you may teach students who have had horrific life experiences and the last thing they may need is a graphic or suggestive “game”. Plus, let’s get with the 21st century already. Who named that game anyway?! Moving on.

I love this game for filling in those blank moments and transitions in class – the beginnings, wrap-ups, and lulls. It’s a fun method of engaging a large group of students, practising the alphabet, and working on spelling and vocabulary. I’ve used this game to introduce new vocabulary or practice known words with students as young as 6.

Make a word or Hangman

17. Apples to Apples

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: $35 CAD

Materials: Apples to Apples game

Number of Players: 2+

Apples to Apples is the PG version of Cards Against Humanity. Enough said!

Apples to Apples speaking and listening language learning game

18. Pictionary / Skribbl.io

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE! or cost of game

Materials: Pictionary game

Number of Players: 2+

Teaching online during the pandemic has been a ride, to say the least. One of my students introduced this website to me and it’s become an online favourite. Essentially Skribbl.io is Pictionary but online. The site has capabilities for several languages and once you get the hang of drawing on a computer, it’s a barrel of laughs. With younger students or new language users I use only the vocabulary we’ve been focusing on, since the website gives the option to type your own words in. With more experienced language users you could see what the computer comes up with, but still might need a dictionary nearby just in case.

Skribbl.io

19. Twenty Questions

Level: Intermediate & Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 2+

Twenty Questions can be a “hot seat” game to start a class or a fill-in activity as you’re wrapping things up. One person is the Question Master and has an idea or word in their mind that the rest of the students must figure out by asking “yes” or “no” questions. A guess counts as a question and questions must be asked in full sentences.

20. Scrabble

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: Approximately $20 – $30 CAD

Materials: Scrabble game, Dictionary (if you want)

Number of Players: 2+

A classic. Definitely for more advanced users of the language. Make sure to have a dictionary on hand.

Scrabble language learning game

21. Simon Says

Level: Beginner

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Humans

Number of Players: 2+

I love this game for Body Breaks with younger students. When I see them getting antsy or know they’re having a tough time concentrating, this physical game is always a winner. Simon Says can be used to practice listening comprehension for body parts, actions (jump, touch toes), directions, and pronunciation (say ____ 10x fast!). It’s great for getting the sillies out, moving their bodies, and practising language all at the same time. It can also be helpful in calming students with commands for belly breathing, stretching, and more.

22. Spot It or Name That

Level: Beginner or Intermediate

Cost: $17+ CAD

Materials: Spot It! game or Name That game

Number of Players: 2+

Spot It is a game based on speed. Each card has one chance of any of the 8 objects on it matching with the same object on another card. Whoever says the matching items first wins the card. Of course the linguistic focus here is a mix of speaking/pronunciation and vocabulary. For a fascinating history of the game, dating back to the 1850s and with ties to Ireland, read the Smithsonian Magazine article here.

Name That is a little more abstract because there are no images, however the main premise still involves lightning speed. Players read the card category and then race to call out an answer starting with the letter on the next card. You can change things up and have students race to write as many things as they can in that category that start with the prescribed letter as well.

Name That Language Game

23. Partner Drawing (instructions)

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 2

When I was in teachers’ college there were only 3 classes that were worth anybody’s time – and thankfully they were in my areas of focus (French, language, international education). The French teacher was intelligent, hip, and bursting with genius ideas for classroom activities. I think I had a teacher crush on her – she was seriously setting the bar high for how to engage a classroom in an effective and fun way.

Anyway, back to the game. Have you ever tried to provide instructions to someone? It’s a difficult task on a good day, never mind trying to do so in another language! However, it is possible to play this with beginner users. Player 1 should work off of an image. This can be something as simple as a large triangle beside a small triangle or as complex as a photograph, and should be hidden from Player 2. Step by step, Player 1 will give instructions for what Player 2 needs to draw. The amount of laughs this game produces is …well, a lot! It’s a great lesson for both speaker and listener about how important clear communication is, and how difficult it can be to achieve when there are so many factors to consider (alertness, knowledge of speaker, knowledge of listener, simplicity with which instructions are delivered, accents, speech or hearing difficulties, distance away from each other, spatial awareness, and on and on). Students quickly learn that it takes two to tango when giving and receiving instructions.

I’ve played this game with students learning their shapes in grade 1 and had great success. The first instruction is about divvying up their page into 4 sections and then from there we focus on shapes (how many, what colour, their size, sometimes their position). The kids love it and they also really enjoy swapping spots and giving the instructions to others. This game is all about perspective, simplicity, and empathy.

24. Rhyme Time / Categories

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: your choice

Number of Players: 3+

I may or may not have come across this game as a drinking game in university, but it’s great for the sober PG classroom too! Player 1 says a word and then subsequent players must say a word that rhymes with the original. There are two no-nos in this game: saying a word that’s already been said and not being able to come up with something. Both stop the game and then it begins with another new word.

A way to add some speed to the game is by adding in the clapping portion and getting a steady beat going among the group. Something like 1 knee slaps and clap, at whatever pace you deem appropriate, will help keep things moving along and get the energy and excitement going.

25. I Spy

Level: Beginner or Intermediate

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Humans

Number of Players: 2+

Another childhood staple, “I Spy” is a fun game with groups or individuals. You know the drill, and thankfully so do the kiddos!

26. Taboo

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: $30 CAD

Materials: Taboo game

Number of Players: 4+

Taboo is one of those games that’s equally frustrating and satisfying. The whole point of the game is that you need to get your playing partners to say the word on your card – without you using that word or several other listed taboo words. It will push your vocabulary and your nerves if you choose to play with the time limit.

Taboo Board Game

27. I Have / Who Has

Level: Beginner or Intermediate

Cost: $2 – $3 CAD

Materials: J’ai / Qui a game

Number of Players: 2+

One of my favourite Teachers Pay Teachers vendors is La classe de Madame Angel because she has J’ai/Qui a (I have/Who has) games for everything. I’ve used this game with kids as young as 4 and they loved it. As you can see in the image, each card has two images and two accompanying sentences. Distribute the deck among all players. Each student takes their turn reading the two sentences on their card(s). For the wee ones, distributing the cards in order can be helpful so they don’t get lost. For older or more comfortable language users, mix the deck up around the group so that students are forced to listen well and pay attention. I once made this a timed competition between a few grade five and six classes and they went haywire for it! Imagine – kids bragging to each other in the halls about what they’re doing in their French class. I was in heaven!

J'ai Qui A - TPT.com La classe de Madame Angel

28. Card Games

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: $1 – $20 CAD

Materials: Deck of cards

Number of Players: 1+

Whether it’s a branded card game like UNO, SkipBo or Go Fish, or a normal deck of cards, the options with this colourful little paper rectangles are endless. Some of my favourites to teach and play with language learners are: Pyramid, Go Fish, Crazy Eights, and Skip-Bo. What are card games you play as a new language user or with your students?

Card Games make great language learning activities

29. Treasure Hunt

Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Cost: FREE!

Materials: Something to write on and with (paper or whiteboard)

Number of Players: 1+

A treasure hunt can be a really fun and creative way for students to direct the vocabulary they want to learn. Whether it’s for in a school or at home, students can make a treasure hunt list or treasure hunt cards for their peers to find. To incorporate the language aspect, students can write out a list of the objects or where the person needs to look or directions for how to get to a location with clues to find the item or find out what they’re searching for. Depending on the technology that’s available, students could create a video giving the instructions, which provides the opportunity to practice listening and speaking skills. Subtitles in the target language may be included to help with reading comprehension as well.

30. Mad Libs

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: $5 – $7 CAD

Materials: Mad Libs book or worksheet, something to write with

Number of Players: 1+

Mad Libs are perfect for reinforcing lessons on word types. These are excellent activities for when a student is finished their work early, or to have a few laughs together as a class. A great writing activity would be to have students create their own Mad Libs and then have fellow classmates complete them.

Mad Libs word game

31. Wordical

Level: Intermediate or Advanced

Cost: $20 CAD

Materials: Wordical Game

Number of Players: 2+

The object of this game is to earn the most points by forming words using a combination of your consonant cards and the vowels you roll with the dice. It’s a race to make the highest point value word using your cards and the dice vowels. The first time I played this was on a winter weekend trip to Windy Lake Provincial Park and it was a ton of fun!

Wordical language game

32. Any Game You Like

At the end of the day, any game can be considered a “language learning” game because they all require some form of communication. So I’m curious, what are your favourite types of games, and have you ever used them to learn a new language before?

Other fun language learning games
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